• ICAO Carbon Dioxide Emissions Standard

ICAO Carbon Dioxide Emissions Standard for Aircraft – Weekly Compliance Digest

September 15, 2017 By
In this edition of the Weekly Compliance Digest, we provide an update on a global CO2 standard for aircraft emissions.

Volume III to Annex 16 of the Chicago Convention (Environmental Protection)

What is it?

Earlier this year, the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) adopted a new aircraft carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions standard that aims to reduce the impacts of aviation greenhouse gas emissions. The aircraft CO2 emissions measure represents the world’s first global design certification standard governing CO2 emissions for any industry sector, ICAO says.

In October 2016, ICAO had agreed to establish a global market-based measure to offset international aviation CO2 emissions, which will be known as the Carbon Offsetting and Reduction Scheme for International Aviation (CORSIA). It also agreed to adopt a CO2 standard for aircraft emissions, which will lead to greater aircraft fuel efficiency alongside CORSIA.

The standard will apply to new aircraft type designs from 2020, and to aircraft type designs already in-production as of 2023. Those in-production aircraft which by 2028 do not meet the standard will no longer be able to be produced unless their designs are sufficiently modified.

What types of aircraft are affected?

Here are more details on the types of aircraft affected, from ICAO’s press release. Note that a “type certificate” is issued to signify the airworthiness of an aircraft manufacturing design or “type”. The certificate is issued by a regulating body, and once issued, the design cannot be changed.

Subsonic jet aeroplanes of greater than 5 700 kg maximum take-off mass for which the application for a type certificate was submitted on or after 1 January 2020, except for those aeroplanes of less than or equal to 60 000 kg maximum take-off mass with a maximum passenger seating capacity of 19 seats or less.

Subsonic jet aeroplanes of greater than 5 700 kg and less than or equal to 60 000 kg maximum take-off mass with a maximum passenger seating capacity of 19 seats or less, for which the application for a type certificate was submitted on or after 1 January 2023.

All propeller-driven aeroplanes of greater than 8 618 kg maximum take-off mass, for which the application for a type certificate was submitted on or after 1 January 2020.

Derived versions of non-CO2-certified subsonic jet aeroplanes of greater than 5 700 kg maximum certificated take-off mass for which the application for certification of the change in type design was submitted on or after 1 January 2023.

Derived versions of non-CO2 certified propeller-driven aeroplanes of greater than 8 618 kg maximum certificated take-off mass for which the application for certification of the change in type design was submitted on or after 1 January 2023.

Individual non-CO2-certified subsonic jet aeroplanes of greater than 5 700 kg maximum certificated take-off mass for which a certificate of airworthiness was first issued on or after 1 January 2028.

Individual non-CO2-certified propeller-driven aeroplanes of greater than 8 618 kg maximum certificated take-off mass for which a certificate of airworthiness was first issued on or after 1 January 2028.

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